Soul Radio Movement – Balamii

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Image from player.balamii.com

DJ mixes are typically appropriated towards a specific timing of the day. When you listen to an hour long mix, it could possibly be that you are studying for an exam, commuting to your job, or jogging through a forest park. Through these potentially tedious ventures, hopefully, the mix has a variety of music to stir or titillate the arduous process.

I had only just recently heard of Balamii in the past Summer by perusing through U.K. producer Maxwell Owin’s SoundCloud page. Although, they appear to have been present in the scene for nearly five years now.


Owin contributed to a DJ mix twice to Balamii with DJ associate and friend Nubya Garcia. Together they conducted a two-hour long mix filled with Alternative Hip-Hop, African Dance and Rhythm music, and most prominently, a lot of Deep House music.

I ended up listening to the mix for a couple of days, repeating some portions mix multiple times. A personal favorite from the mix is Glenn Underground’s rendition of Honey by Erykah Badu, which starts at 58:16.

Audio uploaded by Balamii (SoundCloud) 

Balamii regularly uploads on a daily basis. Each mix typically ranges from one to two hours (or even more) and is composed with a wide array of music genres. Based on what I’ve heard so far, these mixes are mostly composed of Funk, R&B, Dance, Hip-Hop, and Jazz. Although what typically encodes the aesthetic of these mixes are the Deep House tracks.


These mixes are arranged by typically under-the-radar producers and disc jockeys from around the world. These artists could be international household names like Ben Hauke or Joseph Eli, or locally known names such as Homework and Aisha Zoe. Each of the mixes has a pristine black and white photo of the mix arranger, which sets off the feeling of these mixes.

Much of what composes these tracks are typical nightclub tracks popular especially in the U.K. and cities such as Chicago. The Deep House and Soul music that these mixes portray elude a quiet serenity, fitting well with the black and white imagery of the artists.


In the recent years, House and Soul music have been embezzled from the likes of loud, reverberating club music. Although this has always been the case since the inception of Rock music and eventually Rap music, House and Soul music has never lost its touch.

The genres manage to find the right crowd that can please during the outings of young corporate mongrels heading out for a night of fervent escapism.

If there’s a radio channel that keeps the Soul movement alive, Balamii is one to persuade to keep going.

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